Recent Projects & Yarny Goodness

Recent Projects from Jaarn Magazine

I realised I hadn’t shared my recently published projects with you. Frida the Frog from Jaarn Magazine Issue Three, Petals and Posts Scarf and Gloves, and Finn’s Blanket from Jaarn Magazine Issue Four. Better late than never, and all that. The magazine is available in digital format from the Jaarn Shop and Ravelry.

Petals and Posts image courtesy Bren Grobler @hookybren

Meet Olive the Guardian Angel

Olive is the prototype for a design I’m busy working on. Testing has been completed, so it’s really getting there. Olive is made from Vinnis Nikkim (DK, 100% cotton) and a 3.0mm hook. I’m toying with the yarn and hook combination to get a tighter finish without it being too stiff. I want to make several in differing skin tones for a nice variety.

I often use a 2mm hook with DK yarn for amigurumi, but it can be slightly uncomfortable as it is extremely tight, and tension can be tricky. Generally speaking I like yarns with a high twist for ami, such as Nurturing Fibres Eco-Cotton and Colourspun cotton. Both are very comfortable on the hands as the high twist has a bit more of a springiness, and stretch. Yarns with a low twist, like Vinnis Nikkim, can be trickier, but it is still a gorgeous yarn and comes in incredible colours.

While you can, technically speaking, use just about any yarn for amigurumi, I do recommend cotton as it washes and wears very well. My grandson’s toys are testament to that! It gives a smooth and durable finish. If you do want a fluffy finish then wool or acrylic might suit, especially if you brush it. As with anything I recommend going with the right yarn for the right application, and that you buy the best you can afford. I always feel that you put so much heart and soul into a project, why would you want it falling to pieces or pilling? It would be wasting all those hours you spent on it.

Playing with yarn

Winter is pretty much here, and so the evenings grow dark earlier. I find myself snuggled in bed with the pooches embarrassingly early, crochet in hand. I’ve always love African Expressions yarns, my favourite being Harmony. I decided that I wanted to try Joy. Joy is a 15% mohair, 40% wool, 45% acrylic yarn. It is wonderfully soft, with a lustrous sheen. It took a long time for me to work with real wool as I have incredibly sensitive skin. It took even longer for me to pick up mohair. This yarn is truly lovely, and I’ve recently completed a design with it.

I made some test squares with Joy, and this is what they looked like before blocking. I do recommend blocking this type of yarn. It will give a professional and smooth finish, and ensure even shaping. You can refer back to my tutorial on spray blocking if you need a refresher.

I’m glad it’s winter. I miss the Eastern Free State, crackling fires, and comfort food when it’s icy outside. Pretoria really is much milder, but as we hurtle through May I’m really getting that hankering for making blankets and comforting projects with squishy, soft yarns. I have recently destashed my yarns, but daresay I’m itching for another round. It also gives me a chance to go through the not insubstantial stash (even after about five rounds of decluttering), and remind myself of some of the amazing yarns that are in there.

Watch this space.

For those of you in the Southern Hemisphere enjoy the cooler days and nights, and those in the Northern Hemisphere, I hope the flowers and warmer days bring you much joy.

Cheers for now.

About Ginahttp://thefunkysheep.blogI am an obsessive crocheter, and occasional knitter. I also love collecting fabulous yarns.

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